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Tác giả Chủ đề: Ebook Chiến tranh Việt Nam  (Đọc 282080 lần)
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altus
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« Trả lời #250 vào lúc: 11 Tháng Mười Một, 2009, 09:07:47 PM »

Replacing France: The Origins of American Intervention in Vietnam
By Kathryn C. Statler



Using recently released archival materials from the United States and Europe, Replacing France: The Origins of American Intervention in Vietnam explains how and why the United States came to assume control as the dominant western power in Vietnam during the 1950s. Acting on their conviction that American methods had a better chance of building a stable, noncommunist South Vietnamese nation, Eisenhower administration officials systematically ejected French military, economic, political, bureaucratic, and cultural institutions from Vietnam. Kathryn C. Statler examines diplomatic maneuvers in Paris, Washington, London, and Saigon to detail how Western alliance members sought to transform South Vietnam into a modern, westernized, and democratic ally but ultimately failed to counter the Communist threat. Abetted by South Vietnamese prime minister Ngo Dinh Diem, Americans in Washington, D.C., and Saigon undermined their French counterparts at every turn, resulting in the disappearance of a French presence by the time Kennedy assumed office. Although the United States ultimately replaced France in South Vietnam, efforts to build South Vietnam into a nation failed. Instead, it became a dependent client state that was unable to withstand increasing Communist aggression from the North. Replacing France is a fundamental reassessment of the origins of U.S. involvement in Vietnam that explains how Franco-American conflict led the United States to pursue a unilateral and ultimately imperialist policy in Vietnam.

http://ifile.it/0c9vlen
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« Trả lời #251 vào lúc: 11 Tháng Mười Một, 2009, 09:11:09 PM »

UH-1 Huey in Color (Fighting Colors 6564)
By Wayne Mutza



Part of the "Fighting Colours" series, this book looks at the details and specifications of the UH-1 Huey helicopter, which was used extensively during the Vietnam War by American forces.


http://ifile.it/6g7cx8b
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« Trả lời #252 vào lúc: 11 Tháng Mười Một, 2009, 09:14:03 PM »

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Robotic Air Warfare 1917-2007 (New Vanguard 144)
By Steven Zaloga, Ian Palmer (Illustrations)



Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are the most dynamic field of aerospace technology, and potentially the harbingers of new aviation technology and tactics. They have only emerged from the shadows in recent years, but in fact have been in use for decades. After some limited use in World War II, UAVs began to emerge as a substitute for manned reconnaissance aircraft in the 1950s for missions deemed too dangerous to risk an aircrew. Used in significant numbers in the Vietnam War as well as less-heralded missions such as spy flights over China in the 1950s and 1960s, the contemporary UAV began to emerge in the 1980s.

This book examines the development of this unique and mysterious technology, revealing how it has changed combat through the years and speculating on its potential to transform the nature of warfare in the future. Steven J Zaloga examines the pioneering use of UAVs conducted by the Israeli air and the use of UAVs during Operation Desert Storm. Packed with rare, recently declassified photographs and detailed full-color cutaways, this title goes on to investigate the wide deployment of UAVs over Iraq and Afghanistan today, and considers the possible future of the UAV as an actual military weapon.


http://ifile.it/2zqe1dl
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« Trả lời #253 vào lúc: 11 Tháng Mười Một, 2009, 09:18:33 PM »

Wolfpack - Hunting MiGs Over Vietnam
By Jerry Scutts



Here is the true story of the daring aerial combat adventures in Vietnam performed by the U.S. Air Force's MiG hunter-killer squadrons: the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing.

http://ifile.it/8hkycmr
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« Trả lời #254 vào lúc: 11 Tháng Mười Một, 2009, 09:22:01 PM »

Lockheed SR-71: Operations in the Far East (Combat Aircraft 76)
By Paul Crickmore



Even before the first operational flight of the legendary Lockheed U-2 spy plane, aircraft design genius Kelly Johnson began work with his team at the company's "Skunk Works" plant on the type's replacement. The result was the SR-71. First deployed on March 9, 1968, this tri-sonic 'hotrod' flew its first operational sortie over North Vietnam just 12 days later. On that debut mission, the Blackbird overflew surface-to-air missile sites with complete impunity, collecting the detailed intelligence that led directly to the end of the siege of Khe Sanh in the process.

Thereafter, the SR-71 roamed freely over areas previously denied to the vulnerable U-2, capturing photographic, radar and electronic intelligence. This book examines the immense impact this revolutionary aircraft had, not only on North Vietnam but during the Cold War as a whole, gathering information about the Soviet nuclear submarine fleet based in Vladivostok as well as the port's defenses, monitoring the actions of North Korea and flying four 11-hour, non-stop sorties into the Persian Gulf during the Iran-Iraq War in the late 1980s.


http://ifile.it/hcoxuw2
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rongxanh
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Mơ về nơi xa lắm.


« Trả lời #255 vào lúc: 06 Tháng Mười Hai, 2009, 03:53:52 PM »

Quan tư  Tút có biết đến cuốn này không?

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« Trả lời #256 vào lúc: 07 Tháng Mười Hai, 2009, 05:56:44 AM »

Có, dưng mà hồi xưa đọc đã không thấy có gì mới, chưa kể là bây giờ.  Wink
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rongxanh
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Mơ về nơi xa lắm.


« Trả lời #257 vào lúc: 26 Tháng Mười Hai, 2009, 09:44:40 PM »

Có, dưng mà hồi xưa đọc đã không thấy có gì mới, chưa kể là bây giờ.  Wink

Quan tư thử kéo cái này về xem

http://rapidshare.com/files/319150598/Najwiae_ksze.bitwy.XX.wieku-23.Kambod__a.1975-1995_Andrzej.Kowalczyk._puszkin_.rar.html
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« Trả lời #258 vào lúc: 13 Tháng Một, 2010, 06:19:43 AM »

Contending With Nationalism and Communism: British Policy Towards Southeast Asia, 1945-65 (Global Conflict and Security since 1945)
By Peter Lowe



Contending With Nationalism and Communism provides a lucid, concise analysis of the development of British policy in South -East Asia in the twenty years following the defeat of Japan. The principal themes concern nationalism and communism and how Britain worked to achieve accommodation with nationalist movements while containing communist challenges. It is based on archival and published sources. This is the first study to cover British policy from the final stages of the Pacific War to the culmination of confrontation with Indonesia and escalation in Vietnam in 1965. British ministers and officials are seen as pragmatic and realistic, illustrated in the decisions to grant independence to Burma and Malaya, to support SEATO as a defensive concept, to avoid provoking Communist China, to encourage American involvement while discouraging dangerous American initiatives. The fundamental theme is is one of British assertiveness, extending to the close of the Geneva Conference in 1954, and then of gradual British withdrawal while American power expanded rapidly.

This volume examines the development of British policy in Southeast
Asia during a period of approximately twenty years extending from the
closing stages of the Pacific War to the time when confrontation with
Indonesia over the creation of Malaysia peaked and when military escalation
in Vietnam assumed ominous proportions.1 No serious disagreement
existed between the principal political parties in Britain in 1945
concerning aims in the region; it was essential to restore British authority,
to develop an economic role following the havoc resulting from
Japanese occupation, to recognise the new political forces at work, to
establish cordial relations with the leaders of new political movements,
to help in the attainment of a new stability that would promote the longterm
interests of the West and block communism. The right wing of the
Conservative party wished to delay departure from colonial territories
and the left wing of the Labour party wished to hasten departure but
there was no fundamental divergence in the policies pursued by Labour
and Conservative governments. In opposition Winston Churchill was
free to revel in nostalgia for the old empire, as he deplored Clement
Attlee’s policies in the Indian subcontinent and Burma in 1946–48. In
government, between 1951 and 1955, Churchill followed the same path
as his predecessor and permitted more rapid progress towards independence
in Malaya than that contemplated by Attlee. In the earlier
part of the postwar era Britain was still a major power, responsible for
administering an empire of considerable size and responsible additionally
in 1945–46 for assisting in the restoration of French and Dutch
rule in their colonial possessions. The United States was preoccupied
mainly with Japan and with helping Chiang Kai-shek’s Kuomintang
(KMT) regime in China. There was no desire in Washington to become
involved significantly in Southeast Asia other than stopping the British
2 Contending with Nationalism and Communism
from bullying Thailand and prodding the French and the Dutch into
conciliation in Indochina and Indonesia. By 1950, American policy was
changing in consequence of the onset of the Cold War in Asia, associated
with communist triumph in China and anxiety regarding instability
in Southeast Asia. The Korean War propelled America towards
an assertive approach to block the perceived ambitions of the People’s
Republic of China (PRC), led by Mao Tse-tung. The British approach,
illustrated graphically in Anthony Eden’s sharp exchanges with John
Foster Dulles in 1954, was to dissuade the United States from overreacting
while proceeding with the conclusion of a new defence agreement,
leading to the emergence of the Southeast Asia Treaty Organization
(SEATO) in 1954–55. The Geneva conference of 1954 was an important
watershed; it was the last occasion on which Britain diverged successfully
from the United States on a major issue and helped to ensure the
adoption of an outcome not favoured in Washington. The Suez crisis in
1956 undermined British influence and its repercussions pushed Harold
Macmillan’s government into endorsing American policy in Vietnam,
particularly when Macmillan was striving to achieve a close working
relationship with John F. Kennedy. However, no British government
would consider committing British troops to intervention in Vietnam.
The last big challenge facing Britain in 1965 was to secure a satisfactory
end to confrontation in Borneo. Britain’s economic predicament convinced
Harold Wilson’s government to terminate long-standing political
and strategic commitments in Asia except for Hong Kong and the
already qualified support for SEATO.
List of Contents

List of Maps
Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations
Introduction
The Return of Colonialism, 1945-48
The Communist Challenges in Malaya and Indochina
Two Approaches to Containing Communism: The Colombo Plan and SEATO, 1950-65
Democracy, Communism and Militarism in Burma, 1948-65
Ambivalence and Commitment: Vietnam, 1955-65
Britain, Cambodia and Laos, 1955-65
Britain, Thailand and the Philippines, 1945-65
Britain, Indonesia and the Creation of Malaysia, 1959-65
Conclusion
Appendix: List of British Officials
Endnotes
Select Bibliography
Index
Author Biography

PETER LOWE is Author of six books and editor or co-editor of an additional three books. A member of staff at the University of Manchester, UK from 1965-2004, most recently as Reader in History and then Honorary Senior Research Fellow, he is also a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

http://ifile.it/9e5fkzi
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« Trả lời #259 vào lúc: 13 Tháng Một, 2010, 06:22:52 AM »

Comanche Six: Company Commander in Vietnam
By James Estep



A young company commander tells what it was like to inherit an air mobile rifle company of under-achieving infantry soldiers and mold it into a successful fighting outfit in the rice paddies of enemy territory.

http://ifile.it/9y5xvli/089141410X.7z
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